Suicide Squad Review


In a huge effort by me I managed to to avoid most of the hype surrounding this film, watched only the original trailer and read nothing about it in an attempt to not over-hype it before I got the chance to watch it.

Well, finally I have managed to watch this film and was it worth the wait?

In short, not really.

The film felt directionless, like there was no set idea of how they wanted the Suicide Squad to be represented or how to mesh them together on the screen for the best outcome. The scene in the bar felt out of place with the rest of the film and wouldn’t have been missed if they went straight to the finale. Once again, after Batman vs Superman, some of the information being fed to the audience felt forced, particularly the opening scenes detailing the history of Deadshot and Harley Quinn. The false rescue mission to get Waller, and then her escape felt like an anticlimax and didn’t really spend the time needed to build it up before the real threat became apparent, although how they weren’t going to that in the first place beggars belief, stops them being “heroes” and makes them weak play toys for Waller designed to do her bidding, whatever she needs them to do.

Visually the film was appealing at times, the Enchantress looked impressive particularly in her black shroud as was Killer Croc and Diablo when he lost his cool and finally showed his ability. Most of the film is done in dark tones with splashes of colour for emphasis.

suicide squad

Suicide Squad Characters

I also felt that the main threat in the film, the Enchantress and her “machine”, wasn’t really a tangible threat and as such it lacked supplying any real danger to the world or the bunch of protagonists that were trying to stop it. The Enchantresses brother was more of a threat than anything else in this film and it was a shame that he got bumped down the pecking order when the Enchantress became fully powered up.

The Joker story line felt like it was an afterthought, not being fully integrated into the story but is too big a character to be left out. As such he never hits the highs that should be afforded his presence and doesn’t really have any influence on the proceedings. A wasted opportunity, either you add him in properly and make him part of the threat or you take him out and give him the room to breathe in his own space. This did neither.

I’m also not a fan of Deadshot being shown as being a good person at the end. I would have been completely happy to know that he is a deadly assassin with no redeeming features whatsoever, as should be the case with them all. They are supposed to be the worst people on the planet being coerced into doing honourable things, not good people put into bad situations as it turns out in this instance.

Overall I felt a bit let down by this. Something that had a lot of traction (that I tried hard to avoid) never made it out of second gear, just went through the motions. If David Ayer put in even a small part of the style that was evident in some of his previous films this would have been a much better film. Fury, End of Watch and Harsh Times all have an edge that would have been a welcome addition to this film.

I have issues with the perceived ratings of some of these films. The 15 rating in the UK feels like a cop-out. Plenty of shooting and killing but not actual human blood or off-screen. It’s almost like they are using loopholes to avoid a higher rating instead of making a film how they want to make it, holding back the violence in a film that should have celebrated it.
Rating:     610

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